Research

My work consists of scholarly & non scholarly publications, on both popular culture in Africa & African migrant experiences. This includes 3 books (Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati, Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City & Dustyfoot Philosophers, and Pan African Spaces: Essays on Black Transnationalism). The more recent articles and book chapters include “Hip-Hop and Human Rights in Africa”, “Feminisms in African Hip-Hop”, “The Contemporary African Diaspora”, “The Evolution of a Bicultural Identity, in the Shadows of Nyerere’s Pan Africanism”, & the forthcoming “African Women and Hip-Hop in the Diaspora”.

“What Clark does especially well is creating a dialogue in each chapter, giving…insight into how each factor, such as language, is approached differently across different parts of the continent, but then also how they come into dialogue with each other and present different [viewpoints] to the rest of the world. It’s an incredibly rich and dense text, just packed with information, but also very accessible and easy to understand.” Scratched Vinyl

Hip Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers is the first solo-authored book that looks at hip hop music and culture across the continent. The book ties together academic research on hip hop, with images of hip hop culture and artists to present a discussion on hip hop as a form of cultural representation in Africa.

Pan African Space: Essays on Black Transnationalism explores Black identity, from a global perspective. The historical and contemporary migrations of African peoples have brought up some interesting questions regarding identity. This text examines some of those questions, and will provide relevant essays on the identities created by those migrations. Following a regional contextualizing of migration trends, the personal essays with allow for understandings of how those migrations impacted personal and community identities. Each of the personal essays will be written by bicultural Africans/Blacks from around the world. The essays represent a wide spectrum of experiences and viewpoints central to the bicultural Africans/Black experience. The contributors offer poignant and grounded perspectives on the diverse ways race, ethnicity, and culture are experienced, debated, and represented. All of the chapters contribute more broadly to writings on dual identities, and the various ways bicultural Africans/Blacks navigate their identities and their places in African and Diaspora communities.

Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

Other Select Scholarly Articles & Book Chapters

Clark, M.K. (Forthcoming). African women and hip-hop in the Diaspora. The Palgrave Handbook of African Women’s Studies.

Clark, M.K. (2019). The contemporary African Diaspora. In M. Azevedo (Ed), Africana Studies: A Survey of Africa and the African Diaspora (263 – 289). Durham: Carolina Academic Press.

Clark, M.K. (2018). Feminisms in African hip hop. Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, 17 (2), 383-400.

Clark, M.K. (2018). The evolution of a bicultural identity, in the shadows of Nyerere’s Pan Africanism. In M.K. Clark, P. Mnyandu, L. Azalia (Eds), Pan African Spaces: Essays on Black Transnationalism. Lexington Press.

Clark, M. K. (2014). Gendered representations among Tanzanian female emcees. In M.K. Clark and M. Koster (Eds), Ni Wakati: Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa. Lanham, MD: Lexington Press.

Clark, M. K. (2014). The role of new and social media in Tanzanian hip hop production. Les Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, 216 (4), 1115-1136.

Clark, M. K. (2013). The struggle for authenticity and against commercialization in Tanzania. Journal of Pan African Studies, 6 (3), 5-21.

Clark, M. K. (2012). Hip hop as social commentary in Accra and Dar es Salaam. African Studies Quarterly, 13 (3), 23 – 36.

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